Elfball Rules Page 3


Existing Rules:

Safeties: The job of the Safety is to quickly get to the
opponent with the ball and try to tie him up or take him out.
While not skilled ball handlers they are normally the fastest
players in Elfball.

Hunters: Hunters are skilled tacklers of average strength.
Not very agile but handy to free up the ball.

Strikers: Dodging through the opposition and
catching/retrieving the ball is the primary function of Strikers.
However they have trouble dealing with objects larger than
the ball as they are not normally sturdy players or talented at
bringing down opponents.

Throwers: Need a better tackler than a Striker to stay in
the back field and sending the ball flying across the field?
The Thrower is the go to player for this job.

Defenders: Defenders are the muscle of the team.
Exceptionally strong - a successful hit by one of these
players is almost sure to knock a player senseless.

Other Players: Many other creatures both living and
undead play the game of Elfball. Their unusual mix of size
(both huge and tiny), endurance, and willingness to play
honourably mean it is difficult to class them as any of the
standard players that grace an Elfball field normally.

PLAYER ATTRIBUTES
Every player of Elfball has seven attributes which define his
performance on the field. These are:

Jog: This is the maximum number of paces (hexes) which a
player is able to move/act during one turn.

Tackle: This represents the player's ability to attempt to
bring down (i.e. tackle) opponents and prevent opponents
from getting away from him.

Might: This attribute is a player's brute force and controls
the power he can hit with and strength needed to bring him
down.

Dodge: This controls how well a player can disengage from
an opponent and defend against tackles.

Skill: This attribute represents a player's ability to throw,
catch, and pick up the ball.

Grit: This is the player's toughness and his ability to stay in
the game and withstand punishment.

Type: This defines the basic category of the player and
determines which skills he can learn as part of the Advanced
rules for the game (see page 12).

Note: The attributes of all players can be found in the Team
Lists starting on page 15.

PLAYER FACING
Each player has a forward and rear facing. Hitting an
opponent in the back or trying to get away from opponents
looking the other way is easier to do than going head to
head. Whenever the player performing an action starts or
finishes any move or challenge, you must face the eyes of
the player looking in the direction of the facing you want him
to have (even if the action ends with a Shift in Momentum
(see page 5) If it is unclear which way a player is facing (i.e.
he is looking on a line),
the opposing coach may
decide which hex he is
facing.
Facing is determined
based on the image to
the right. The hex the
player's eyes are
looking at and the 2
hexes to each side of it
are his front facing
hexes. All other hexes
are considered rear
facing.

ACTIONS & CHALLENGES
An action is defined by a series of challenges and movement
that a player can perform until he runs out of paces of Jog to
use or has an action ending Shift of Momentum event
(described on page 5). Note: a player's action includes
another player trying to catch any Throw that he performs.
When a player attempts to perform any type of physical
activity which requires a dice roll to determine whether it is a
success or failure, it is referred to as a challenge.
In order to attempt a challenge, you roll a number of
Challenge dice equal to the attribute for that challenge with a
given number of successes needed for that challenge (if the
number of successes needed is less than 1 then the
challenge is treated as needing 1 success). Every
challenge die which rolls a conditional success must be
rolled again with the new result adding to list of rolls. Any die
which rolls a conditional success on the second roll
continues being rolled and added to the list of rolls until each
rolls a result other than a conditional success. (Note: using
spare dice or blank rolls is a great way to roll for conditional
successes without remembering the other dice rolls).

Example: You attempt to pick up the ball from the playing
field with one standing opponent in an adjacent hex with a
player with a Skill attribute of 4. You need two successes to
pick up the ball. You roll 4 dice due to your Skill attribute and
roll flop, blank, and 2 conditional successes. You roll the two
dice with conditional successes again and roll a blank and a
conditional success. One more roll of the die that was a
conditional success results in a success. This means for this
challenge you rolled a flop, 2 blanks, a success, and 3
conditional successes for a total of 3 successes (1 success +
3 conditional successes - 1 flop) which enables the player to
successfully pick up the ball.
You must also keep track of the number of dice which roll a
flop. If a challenge results in more flops than successes, the
player has "flopped" the challenge, usually with disastrous
results.
Example: You attempt to pick up the ball from the playing
field with no players adjacent to it with a player with a Skill
attribute of 3 thus you need one success. You roll a flop, a
blank, and a conditional success. You roll the conditional
success again and roll a flop. For this challenge you have
rolled two flops, a blank, and a conditional success and so
you have flopped the challenge as you have two flops and
only one success.

Suggested revisions:


Can I suggest adding a table listing all possible challenges, and putting associated attribute next to each challenge? Also...possibly another column highlighting if each failed challenge costs a point of jog, or results in a SiM? (thoughts?)

I've had a go at rewording the "Actions And Challenges" section, but I also think it would be better if it was moved so that it came after "Turn Sequence" on page 4.

Actions and Challenges
During a turn, the coach may select any of his players to perform an action. The selected player must not be the same player that was activated on their previous turn (ie the same player may only perform an action every other turn).
If a team has only one player on the field, then he may perform an action on consecutive turns.

During an action, a player may move a number of hexes up to their Jog attribute. At any point during this move the player may also attempt many different challenges. A challenge is any type of physical activity which requires a dice roll to check if the activity was successful, such as picking up the ball or shoving an opposing player. Each challenge is tied to a particular attribute, and this attribute will dictate how many challenge dice the coach will roll in order to check if they are successful. The more difficult the task, the more “successes” they will need to score on the rolled dice.

For example, picking up the ball when under no pressure is a relatively simple task and only requires the coach to roll 1 success in order to pass the challenge. However, attempting to catch a wobbly pass with two opponents breathing down your neck is much more difficult and will require the coach to roll at least 4 successes!

Below is a list of all challenge types available to the active player, and each is described in more detail later.
Challenges tied to the Skill attribute:
  • Pick up
  • Throw
  • Catch
  • Intercept (only available if an opponent’s throw passes over your hex)
Challenges tied to the Might attribute
  • Shove. Number of shoves are limited to half your Jog (rounded up)
  • Impact (only once per turn)
Challenges tied to the Tackle attribute
  • Tackle (only once per turn)
Challenges tied to the Dodge attribute
  • Disengage
Other challenges
  • Dash

To attempt a challenge, the coach rolls as many special challenge dice as the associated attribute of the player involved. The more difficult the task, the more “successes” will be needed on the rolled dice in order to pass the challenge.

The faces on the challenge dice are broken down thus:
Icon
Name
Effect
X
Flop
-1 success
[blank]
Blank
Nothing
[bullseye]
Success
+1 success
[star]
Conditional
+1 success and 1 extra dice must be rolled, adding the result to the rest*
*Every challenge die which rolls a star adds one to the number of successes but one extra die must be rolled for each, with the new result adding to list of rolls. Any die which rolls a conditional success on the second roll continues being rolled and added to the list of rolls until each rolls a result other than a conditional success. (Note: using spare dice or blank rolls is a great way to roll for conditional successes without remembering the other dice rolls).

You must also keep track of the number of dice which roll a flop. If a challenge results in more flops than successes, the player has "flopped" the challenge, usually with disastrous results.

Providing the outcome of a challenge does not result in a turn-ending event, the player may attempt more challenges, or continue to move if they have enough paces of Jog left.

Revised Wording: